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CJN Onnoghen reveals what judges must not do on social media

The Chief Justice of Nigeria, Walter Onnoghen, on Monday, warned judicial officers to refrain from commenting on matters of public interest on social media, stressing that they should desist from uploading pictures of their holiday and personal activities online.

The CJN, who handed the warning on Monday at the first biannual lecture of the Lagos state judiciary held at Lagos City Hall, also admonished judges to henceforth ensure the removal of their personal information online.

He, however, stated that judges who are desirous of discussing public matters on the social media can only do so without revealing their identity.

Onnoghen, represented by a justice of the Supreme Court, Olabode Rhodes-Vivour, also called for the study of law in the university to be made a second degree in view of the low standard of education in Nigeria.

Speaking on the theme, ‘Judicial Standards, Integrity, Respect and Public Perception: A Comparative Analysis from Independence In 1960 Into The Present Millennium,’ Onnoghen lamented the undue interference of politicians in the process of judges appointment.

He stated that the current system of judges’ appointment in the country was such that the governor of a state might not allow the names of persons nominated for judicial appointment to be sent to the National Judicial Council, NJC, for scrutiny if the names of the governor’s candidates were not included on the list.

“Appointment of judges have become highly politicised as a governor of a state will not approve the names of persons nominated for the bench for NJC scrutiny if the names of his candidates are not included on that list,” the CJN said.

He went on to state that lawyers who wanted to be appointed into the bench, in addition to 10 years post call requirement, should also be mandated to have post graduate diploma.

These, according to Onnoghen, would go a long way in further advancing the frontiers of justice delivery in the country.











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